Top Ten Tuesday: 10 Things I Love About You

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish.
Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish.

Today is not really about you, but I do love you if you are stopping by here to read. OK, I also love some folks who are not reading, but I love you more. The actual theme is “10 things I love about ‘x'”, where x=thing I love. Since I am trying to focus on both running and read you’ll get 5 about each love.

Reading

  1. “The Zone” – I know you know what I mean. That place where you don’t want to put down the book, where the story is everything, where hours fly by and suddenly you realize you have missed meals and phone calls and texts.
  2. “Signings” – I have not been to many but I have discovered I am willing to drive a ridiculous distance to listen to a favorite author speak/read and get a copy of a favorite book signed.
  3. “Sharing recommendations” – “Wait have you read this one?” “You need to borrow this one!” “I love this book and I know you will too.”
  4. “Escape” – Whether it is Narnia, Brakebills, Hogwarts, Pern or 100 other worlds, I get to be there for a little while. Sometimes for much too short a period of time. Sometimes I get to visit over and over. But those worlds are always beckoning me.
  5. “The Library” – I have been going to the same library now for about 15 years. I love the people and the events and the way that is smells and looks and the calm that exists in the place where I find community and books and laughter.

Running

  1. “Sleep” –  When I run I sleep. When I don’t run I don’t sleep much. This has a huge impact on my life. Sleep is good. As Jim Butcher says in Death Masks “Sleep is God. Go worship.”
  2. “Accomplishment” – I ran .25 miles more today. I got a PR. I ran for longer without stopping. There are very tangible achievements in running. If the rest of my day sucked often I can say but at least I ran.
  3. “Other Runners” – From the runners at races to the ones who help me find shoes that helped me run better to the ones online who answer 700 dumb questions a month. From the ones who run a 17 minute pace to the ones that run a 7 minute pace. I have yet to meet an unfriendly, unhelpful runner.
  4.  & 5. “Zombies, Run” – This is the thing I love the most. I love the app. I love the company. I love the developers. I am so in debt to this thing and those people who make it. I am Runner 5 and I have saved Abel Township. I have laughed, cried, yelled and punched the air while running all because the world is so immersive.  Now add to this a group of people online who I love more and more every day as they share my love for the app and I am discovering mutual support and encouragement and tons of love for each other. Yup this deserves two spots on the list.

Ten (Fiction) Books Every Sociologist Should Read

 Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish.
Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish.

Most of these will lean heavily toward science fiction or fantasy. In other life I was a sociology professor who taught at a mid-sized university. My dream course, the one I never got to teach, was one called Sociology through science fiction. We were going to include books, movies and TV as a way to explore sociological concepts. There have been a few books I would add to list I had back then but here are my top ten and one of the concepts illustrated in the story.

The Hunger Games Trilogy: The Hunger Games / Catching Fire / Mockingjay A Canticle for Leibowitz  Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep Omnibus
 Inequality and Revolution  Religion  Stratification
 The Man Who Sold The Moon  Brave New World and Brave New World Revisited  The Forest of Hands and Teeth
 Capitalism  Eugenics  Culture
 Soylent Green Childhood’s End  The Left Hand of Darkness
 Overpopulation Race Gender
 Minority Report
 Crime and Punishment

 

Top Ten Tuesday: 10 Characters

toptentuesday2
Each week The Broke and The Bookish will post a new Top Ten list  that one of our bloggers here at The Broke and the Bookish will answer. Everyone is welcome to join.

This week is a two option week: Ten Characters Everyone Loves But I Just Don’t Get or Ten Characters I LOVE But Others Seem To Dislike. I often try to do a bit of both on these weeks.

5 character everyone loves

  1. Edward Cullen (Twilight) – Not a romantic hero, kind of a creepy stalker. Even if you take away the awful weakening of the vampire mythos by Meyers.
  2. Bella Swan (Twilight) – A wet dustrag has more personality.
  3. Gale (The Hunger Games) – He just never seemed to develop into a fully formed character.
  4. Christian Grey (50 Shades of Grey) – I couldn’t even get through the first book because I disliked him so much.
  5. Scarlett O’Hara (Gone With the Wind) – Some people think she is a survivor but that doesn’t mean she was not a selfish selfish woman.

4 characters everyone dislikes:

  1. Miss Havisham (Great Expectations) – Maybe I just love the crazy old lady vibe so much is cancels out all of the rest of heartlessness.
  2. Heathcliff (Wuthering Heights) – I love me a good jerk.
  3. Dorian Gray (The Picture of Dorian Gray) – I am not sure if this is too heavily influenced by Penny Dreadful.
  4. Beth March (Little Women) – I will be honest, I have not reread this as an adult but I do remember that Beth was hands down my favorite character.

1 character who I hate but I loved the book(s) anyway:

  1. Quentin Coldwater (The MagiciansThe Magicians: A Novel (Magicians Trilogy)) – He gets everything he has EVER wanted and possibly I have ever wanted (Magic and the magical land you grew up with are both REAL) and he still is miserable.

Top Ten Tuesday: You Can’t Always Get What You Want

Top Ten Tuesday

Each week The Broke and the Bookish will post a new Top Ten list that one or more of their bloggers will answer. Everyone is welcome to join.

So This week’s topic for Top Ten is one that shows again how weirdly eclectic my reading is.  I have gone to GoodReads to find the oldest things on my to read list that I still really want to get my hands on but I am still unable to find. And may in fact be too broke to buy. So here are my Top Ten Books I Really Want To Read But Don’t Own Yet.


The Boys, Volume 1: The Name of the Game by Garth Ennis

THIS IS GOING TO HURT! In a world where costumed heroes soar through the sky and masked vigilantes prowl the night, someone’s got to make sure the “supes” don’t get out of line. And someone will. Billy Butcher, Wee Hughie, Mother’s Milk, The Frenchman and The Female are The Boys: A CIA backed team of very dangerous people, each one dedicated to the struggle against the most dangerous force on Earth-superpower. Some superheores have to be watched. Some have to be controlled. And some of them-sometimes-need to be taken out of the picture That’s when you call in THE BOYS.[1]


Fables, Vol. 10: The Good Prince (Fables, #10) by Bill Willingham

Collecting issues #60-69 of the hit series, collecting the epochal “Good Prince” storyline. Flycatcher is drawn into the spotlight as he discovers the startling truth about his own past as the Frog Prince. At the same time, he learns that the Adversary plans to destroy his foes once and for all. How can the meek Flycatcher stop this deadly foe?[2]


I Wanna Be Your Joey Ramone by Stephanie Kuehnert

The Clash. Social Distortion. Dead Kennedys. Patti Smith. The Ramones. Punk rock is in Emily Black’s blood. Her mother, Louisa, hit the road to follow the incendiary music scene when Emily was four months old and never came back. Now Emily’s all grown up with a punk band of her own, determined to find the tune that will bring her mother home. Because if Louisa really is following the music, shouldn’t it lead her right back to Emily?[3]


Morphology of the Folktale by Vladimir Propp

Morphology will in all probability be regarded by future generations as one of the major theoretical breakthroughs in the field of folklore in the twentieth century. — Alan Dundes Propp’s work is seminal…[and], now that it is available in a new edition, should be even more valuable to folklorists who are directing their attention to the form of the folktale, especially to those structural characteristics which are common to many entries coming from even different cultures.[4]


Don’t Bet on the Prince:
Contemporary Feminist Fairy Tales in North America and England
by Jack Zipes

This anthology of feminist fairy tales and critical essays acts as an example of how the literature of fantasy and imagination can be harnessed to create a new view of the world. It demonstrates how recent writers have changed the aesthetic constructs and social content of fairy tales to reflect cultural change since the 1960s in area of gender roles, socialization and education. It includes selected works from such writers as Angela Carter, Margaret Atwood and Jay Williams, and critical essays from Marcia Lieberman and Sandra Gilbert. [5]


ArchEnemy (The Looking Glass Wars, #3) by Frank Beddor

Now it’s all about the artillery as AD52s, crystal shooters, spikejack tumblers, and orb cannons are unleashed in a war of weapons and brute force.
As Alyss searches wildly for the solution to the disaster that has engulfed her queendom, Arch declares himself King of Wonderland. The moment is desperate enough for Alyss to travel back to London for answers, where Arch’s assassins are threatening Alice Liddell and her family. But after coming to the Liddells’ assistance, Alyss discovers herself trapped in a conundrum of evaporating puddles. The shimmering portals that exist to transport her home through the Pool of Tears are disappearing!
What is happening in Wonderland? Deep within the Valley of Mushroom the Caterpillar Oracles issue this prophecy: “Action shall be taken to ensure the safety of the Heart Crystal. For Everqueen.” But who is Everqueen?
As the metamorphosis of Wonderland unfolds, enemies become allies, bitter rivals face off, and Queen Alyss and Redd Heart must both confront their pasts in this thrilling, no-holds-barred conclusion to the New York Times bestselling series.[6]

[amazon_image id="1566444268" link="true" target="_blank" size="medium" ]Good Masters! Sweet Ladies![/amazon_image]
Good Masters! Sweet Ladies!: Voices from a Medieval Village
by Laura Amy Schlitz

Step back to medieval 1255 England and meet 22 villagers, illustrated in pen and ink, inspired by the Munich-Nuremberg manuscript, an illuminated poem from thirteenth-century Germany.
Hugo, the lord’s nephew, proves his manhood by hunting a wild boar. Sharp-tongued Nelly supports her family by selling live eels. Peasant Mogg gets a clever lesson in how to save a cow from a greedy landlord. Barbary slings mud on noble Jack. Alice is the singing shepherdess. And many more . . .[7]


The Asylum for Wayward Victorian Girls by Emilie Autumn

Presenting Emilie Autumn’s long awaited autobiographical, reality-bending thriller, “The Asylum for Wayward Victorian Girls.” This beautifully bound hardcover volume measures 8″ x 11.5″ and clocks in at a massive 274 fully illustrated pages. Positively packed with hand-written memoirs, photos, and paintings, this profoundly empowering epic not only deserves a place on your tea table, it is also one of the most complete accounts of bipolar disorder ever penned, and will take readers behind the doors of both modern day psych ward and Victorian insane asylum in this true life horror tale of madness, murder, and medical experimentation.
But reader beware: It’s much easier to get into the Asylum than it is to get out.[8]


The Last Burning of New London by Danielle Myers

London Ruins is the head of a post-apocalyptic empire that spans across all the habitable land of Western Europe, and survives under the rule of Donovan, a reclusive, self-serving monarch. Donovan’s Royal Task Force carries out the assignment of eliminating all who oppose him by burning them alive within their houses. One group stands up against him, a legendary group of rebels called The Flames whose members are never seen, never heard, their actions only known after they have vanished.[9]


The Never King by George Tyson

The once-great democracies of the West are slowly crumbling. In Britain, there is talk of revolution as anti-government demonstrations are met with lethal force. Then in an obscure English country carnival, a young man pulls a sword out of a boulder and is hailed as Britain’s mythic savior, its Once and Future King.
Enter Peter Quince, a professor of theology whose specialty is the old folk religions of the Celts – the so-called “Fairy Faith.” He’s recruited for a manhunt in which he quickly becomes the hunted. His flight to save his life takes him across a prehistoric landscape and climaxes in a shocking confrontation in the ruined castle in which King Arthur was allegedly born. Along the way, he must summon his old courage and confront his secret fear that he’s always been insane.
Quantum mechanics and a wizard’s prophesy, future weapons and ancient legends, mankind’s fate and an undying love for a crazy, beautiful woman – they’re all right here in The Never King.[10]

Line

1. GoodReads – The Boys
2. GoodReads – Fables 
3. GoodReads – Joey Ramone
4. GoodReads – Morphology
5. GoodReads – Don’t Bet on the Prince
6. GoodReads – ArchEnemy
7. GoodReads – Good Masters! Sweet Ladies!
8. GoodReads – Wayward Victorian Girls
9. GoodReads – New London
10. GoodReads -The Never King

Summer Lovin’: Top Ten Tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday

Each week The Broke and the Bookish will post a new Top Ten list that one or more of their bloggers will answer. Everyone is welcome to join.

This week’s topic is Ten Books That Will Be In My Beach Bag This Summer. And for the first time in YEARS I will have a beach bag which will be going to the beach. I will be sitting on a deck or in the sand listening to the waves and reading. Sigh, 12 days, only 12 more days! Most of these are either OMG new to me through Armchair BEA or on my TBR pile forever.


More Than This – Patrick Ness

A boy drowns, desperate and alone in his final moments. He dies.
Then he wakes, naked and bruised and thirsty, but alive.
How can this be? And what is this strange deserted place?
As he struggles to understand what is happening, the boy dares to hope. Might this not be the end? Might there be more to this life, or perhaps this afterlife? 1


Crane – Stacey Rourke

The Horseman is unending,
his presence shan’t lessen.
If you break the curse,
you become the legend.
Washington Irving and Rip Van Winkle had no choice but to cover up the deadly truth behind Ichabod Crane’s disappearance. Centuries later, a Crane returns to Sleepy Hollow awakening macabre secrets once believed to be buried deep. 
What if the monster that spawned the legend lived within you?
Now, Ireland Crane, reeling from a break-up and seeking a fresh start, must rely on the newly awakened Rip Van Winkle to discover the key to channeling the darkness swirling within her. Bodies are piling high and Ireland is the only one that can save Sleepy Hollow by embracing her own damning curse. 
But is anyone truly safe when the Horseman rides? 2


The Thickety: A Path Begins – J. A. White

Hand in hand, the witch’s children walked down the empty road.
When Kara Westfall was six years old, her mother was convicted of the worst of all crimes: witchcraft. Years later, Kara and her little brother, Taff, are still shunned by the people of their village, who believe that nothing is more evil than magic . . . except, perhaps, the mysterious forest that covers nearly the entire island. It has many names, this place. Sometimes it is called the Dark Wood, or Sordyr’s Realm. But mostly it’s called the Thickety.
The black-leaved trees swayed toward Kara and then away, as though beckoning her.
The villagers live in fear of the Thickety and the terrible creatures that live there. But when an unusual bird lures Kara into the forbidden forest, she discovers a strange book with unspeakable powers. A book that might have belonged to her mother.
And that is just the beginning of the story. 3

Dreams of Gods & Monsters (Daughter of Smoke and Bone)
Dreams of Gods & Monsters – Laini Taylor

By way of a staggering deception, Karou has taken control of the chimaera rebellion and is intent on steering its course away from dead-end vengeance. The future rests on her, if there can even be a future for the chimaera in war-ravaged Eretz.
Common enemy, common cause.
When Jael’s brutal seraph army trespasses into the human world, the unthinkable becomes essential, and Karou and Akiva must ally their enemy armies against the threat. It is a twisted version of their long-ago dream, and they begin to hope that it might forge a way forward for their people.
And, perhaps, for themselves. Toward a new way of living, and maybe even love.
But there are bigger threats than Jael in the offing. A vicious queen is hunting Akiva, and, in the skies of Eretz … something is happening. Massive stains are spreading like bruises from horizon to horizon; the great winged stormhunters are gathering as if summoned, ceaselessly circling, and a deep sense of wrong pervades the world.
What power can bruise the sky?
From the streets of Rome to the caves of the Kirin and beyond, humans, chimaera and seraphim will fight, strive, love, and die in an epic theater that transcends good and evil, right and wrong, friend and enemy. 
At the very barriers of space and time, what do gods and monsters dream of? And does anything else matter? 4

The Secret History of the Pink Carnation
The Secret History of the Pink Carnation – Lauren Willig

Deciding that true romantic heroes are a thing of the past, Eloise Kelly, an intelligent American who always manages to wear her Jimmy Choo suede boots on the day it rains, leaves Harvard’s Widener Library bound for England to finish her dissertation on the dashing pair of spies the Scarlet Pimpernel and the Purple Gentian. What she discovers is something the finest historians have missed: a secret history that begins with a letter dated 1803. Eloise has found the secret history of the Pink Carnation the most elusive spy of all time, the spy who single-handedly saved England from Napoleon’s invasion.
The Secret History of the Pink Carnation, a wildly imaginative and highly adventurous debut, opens with the story of a modern-day heroine but soon becomes a book within a book. Eloise Kelly settles in to read the secret history hoping to unmask the Pink Carnation’s identity, but before she can make this discovery, she uncovers a passionate romance within the pages of the secret history that almost threw off the course of world events. How did the Pink Carnation save England? What became of the Scarlet Pimpernel and the Purple Gentian? And will Eloise Kelly find a hero of her own? 5


Ophelia and the Marvelous Boy – Karen Foxlee

A modern-day fairy tale set in a mysterious museum that is perfect for readers of Roald Dahl and Blue Balliett.
Unlikely heroine Ophelia Jane Worthington-Whittard doesn’t believe in anything that can’t be proven by science. She and her sister Alice are still grieving for their dead mother when their father takes a job in a strange museum in a city where it always snows. On her very first day in the museum Ophelia discovers a boy locked away in a long forgotten room. He is a prisoner of Her Majesty the Snow Queen. And he has been waiting for Ophelia’s help.
As Ophelia embarks on an incredible journey to rescue the boy everything that she believes will be tested. Along the way she learns more and more about the boy’s own remarkable journey to reach her and save the world.
A story within a story, this a modern day fairytale is about the power of friendship, courage and love, and never ever giving up. 6


Shadow of Night – Deborah Harkness

Historian Diana Bishop, descended from a line of powerful witches, and long-lived vampire Matthew Clairmont have broken the laws dividing creatures. When Diana discovered a significant alchemical manuscript in the Bodleian Library,she sparked a struggle in which she became bound to Matthew. Now the fragile coexistence of witches, daemons, vampires and humans is dangerously threatened.
Seeking safety, Diana and Matthew travel back in time to London, 1590. But they soon realise that the past may not provide a haven. Reclaiming his former identity as poet and spy for Queen Elizabeth, the vampire falls back in with a group of radicals known as the School of Night. Many are unruly daemons, the creative minds of the age, including playwright Christopher Marlowe and mathematician Thomas Harriot.
Together Matthew and Diana scour Tudor London for the elusive manuscript Ashmole 782, and search for the witch who will teach Diana how to control her remarkable powers… 7


The Alehouse Murders – Maureen Ash

A Templar treasure for mystery readers!
An honorable-yet world-weary-Knight Templar solves the mysteries of Medieval England.
After eight years of captivity in the Holy Land, Templar Bascot de Marins escapes with injuries to his body and soul. Now on a sojourn at Lincoln Castle, he hopes to regain his strength, and mend his waning faith-but not even the peace of God’s countryside is safe from the mortal crimes of man. For what appears to be the grisly end to a drunken row is in fact a cunning and baffling crime. 8


Witches Abroad – Terry Pratchett

Once upon a time there was a fairy godmother named Desiderata who had a good heart, a wise head, and poor planning skills—which unfortunately left the Princess Emberella in the care of her other (not quite so good and wise) godmother when DEATH came for Desiderata. So now it’s up to Magrat Garlick, Granny Weatherwax, and Nanny Ogg to hop on broomsticks and make for far-distant Genua to ensure the servant girl doesn’t marry the Prince.
But the road to Genua is bumpy, and along the way the trio of witches encounters the occasional vampire, werewolf, and falling house (well this is a fairy tale, after all). The trouble really begins once these reluctant foster-godmothers arrive in Genua and must outwit their power-hungry counterpart who’ll stop at nothing to achieve a proper “happy ending”—even if it means destroying a kingdom. 9


Fire (Graceling Realm, #2) – Kristin Cashore

It is not a peaceful time in the Dells. The young King Nash clings to his throne while rebel lords in the north and south build armies to unseat him. The mountains and forests are filled with spies and thieves and lawless men.
This is where Fire lives. With a wild, irresistible appearance and hair the color of flame, Fire is the last remaining human monster. Equally hated and adored, she had the unique ability to control minds, but she guards her power, unwilling to steal the secrets of innocent people. Especially when she has so many of her own.
Then Prince Brigan comes to bring her to King City, The royal family needs her help to uncover the plot against the king. Far away from home, Fire begins to realize there’s more to her power than she ever dreamed. Her power could save the kingdom.
If only she weren’t afraid of becoming the monster her father was. 10

I’ll Come Running: Top Ten Tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday
Each week The Broke and the Bookish will post a new Top Ten list that one or more of their bloggers will answer. Everyone is welcome to join.


Shug and Ceilie in The Color Purple by Alice Walker

“If she come, I be happy. If she don’t, I be content. And then I figure this the lesson I was suppose to learn.”


Harry, Ron and Hermione from the Harry Potter Series by J.K. Rowling

“But will it cover all three of us?” said Ron.
“All – all three of us?”
“Oh, come off it, you don’t think we’d let you go alone?”
“Of course not,” said Hermione briskly. How do you think you’d get to the Stone without us?”


Frodo Baggins and Samwise Gamgee from The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien

“Still I wonder if we shall ever be put into songs or tales. We’re in one, of course; but I mean: put into words, you know, told by the fireside, or read out of a great big book with red and black letters, years and years afterwards. And people will say: ‘Let’s hear about Frodo and the Ring!’ And they’ll say: ‘Yes, that’s one of my favourite stories, Frodo was very brave, wasn’t he dad?’ ‘Yes, my boy, the famousest of the hobbits, and that’s saying a lot.’ ”

“It’s saying a lot too much.” said Frodo, and he laughed, a long clear laugh from his heart.

“Why Sam,” he said, “to hear you somehow makes me as merry as if the story was already written. But you’ve left out one of the chief characters” ‘ Samwise the stouthearted, I want to hear more about Sam, dad. Why didn’t they put in more of his talk, dad? That’s what I like, it makes me laugh. And Frodo wouldn’t have got far without Sam, would he, dad?’ ”

“Now, Mr. Frodo,” said Sam, “you shouldn’t make fun. I was serious.”

“So was I,” said Frodo, “and so I am.”


Todd and Viola from Chaos Walking series by Patrick Ness

“It’s always nice when two people who don’t got no one else find each other as friends.”


Charlotte and Wilbur from Charlotte’s Web by E. B. White

Wilbur blushed. “But I’m not terrific, Charlotte. I’m just about average for a pig.”

“You’re terrific as far as I’m concerned,” replied Charlotte, sweetly, “and that’s what counts. You’re my best friend, and I think you’re sensational. Now stop arguing and go get some sleep!”

The Complete Sherlock Holmes (The Heirloom Collection)
Holmes & Dr. Watson from the Sherlock Holmes mysteries by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

“You have a grand gift for silence, Watson. It makes you quite invaluable as a companion.” 

By John Steinbeck: Of Mice and Men
George and Lennie in Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

“With us it ain’t like that. We got a future. We got somebody to talk to that gives a damn about us. We don’t have to sit in no bar room blowin’ in our jack jus’ because we got no place else to go. If them other guys gets in jail they can rot for all anybody gives a damn. But not us.”

Lennie broke in. “But not us! An’ why? Because… because I got you to look after me, and you got me to look after you, and that’s why.” He laughed delightedly. “Go on now, George!”


Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson

“Things are never quite as scary when you’ve got a best friend.”

Encyclopedia Brown Box Set (4 Books)
Leroy ‘Encyclopedia’ Brown & Sally Kimbal in the Encyclopedia Brown Series by Donald J. Sobol

The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making

September and A-through-L in the Fairyland Stories by Catherynne M. Valente

“Hearts set about finding other hearts the moment they are born, and between them, they weave nets so frightfully strong and tight that you end up bound forever in hopeless knots, even to the shadow of a beast you knew and loved long ago.”